History: Racquets to Big Data

HomeHistory: Racquets to Big Data

Reinventing Racquets

A building in which people once played one of the oldest sports, faded into the shadows of Newcastle upon Tyne  – a city that today boasts one of the highest growth rates of digital start-ups and has earned a reputation as a centre for digital, software and technological innovation and entrepreneurial spirit. This old building wasn’t going to be forgotten any longer.

Why have we spelt ‘Racquets’ wrong?

Well, we haven’t. Racquets was historically played, in the open, on the yard walls of the two main London debtors’ prisons. These were The King’s Bench in Southwark and The Fleet, located near what is now Farringdon Street.

Newcastle’s Racquets Court was designed by Hubert Laws and built in 1888. There are only two surviving Racquets Courts left in the North of England which is probably why the spelling is perhaps unfamiliar to the modern-day observer.

What Changed?

The building sat untouched, derelict, for 25 years before its potential was realised in 2015 by Paul Miller & Mike Lowenstein, Co-Founders of Gavurin  The ‘idea’ has been to create an environment where like-minded people could work, share ideas and inspire one another.

Core principles

In 2016, Auxin Partnership,  working for Newcastle Gateshead Initiative, surveyed the digital technology sector in the area. This research helped us understand what the people working and thriving in this sector wanted and needed.

THE most important requirement (for 94% of respondents) was great connectivity. So, the restored Racquets Court has the best connectivity possible delivered by the Stellium network.  Here’s some more info on that.

And then there’s location, and style and comfort.  There’s more about the restoration of The Racquets Court here.

Contact us today

Work in the best-connected space in Newcastle